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Advanced Placement

NCPA engages students in the rigorous academic courses of AP as a center component of the Junior/Senior years of study.

 

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a challenging academic program designed to provide motivated high school students with college-level academic courses.

Established in 1955 by the College Board, the AP Program is considered a standard for academic excellence in the United States. AP courses with qualifying exam grades are accepted for credit, advanced placement or both, by most American colleges and universities.

In addition, AP courses are used in the admissions process in more that 400 universities outside of the United States. Students enrolled in an AP course at NCPA are highly encouraged to take the AP exam in May.

 

NCPA offers the following AP Courses:

 

-       Language: English Language & Composition.

-       Sciences: Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Environmental Science.

-       Mathematics: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Statistics.

-       Social Sciences: Macroeconomics, Human Geography.

-       Electives: 2D Art, 3D Art, Drawing & Painting.

 

The AP Program offers several AP Scholar Awards to recognize high school students who have demonstrated college-level achievement through AP courses and exams.

In the 2016-17 school year, NCPA had 55 total AP scholars:

 

28 AP Scholars - granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on three or more AP exams.

6 AP Scholars with Honor - granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.25 on all AP exams, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams.

21 AP Scholars with Distinction - granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.

 

One exemplary NCPA Scholar received an average score of at least 4 out of all exams taken AND scores of 4 or higher on eight or more exams taken in this exam period. A student in the United States with this achievement would be designated a National AP Scholar.  Quite an achievement!